Anuradha Udunuwara, Engineer, Sri Lanka Telecom

Anuradha Udunuwara, Engineer, Sri Lanka Telecom

Anuradha Udunuwara, Engineer, Sri Lanka Telecom is speaking on Day One of the 9th annual LTE Asia conference, taking place on the 23rd-25th September 2014 at the Marina Bay Sands, Singapore. Click here to download a brochure for the event.

In this Q&A Udunuwara tells us about the challenges facing Sri Lanka Telecom’s network, and what the most important technologies to look at for enhancing the network.

What are the major network-related engineering challenges you expect to face over the next 12 months?

In terms of challenges, I see fewer engineering challenges and more commercial and financial challenges. While technology and engineering enables us to overcome most of the challenges, the real challenge for operators will be how to minimize CAPEX/OPEX/TCO and increase revenue/profits. That requires innovation, common sense, changing plans and taking risks.

On the network side, what’s important is supporting the increased bandwidth requirements and optimizing packet transport techniques. Major challenges will arise in supporting migrations from legacy [Circuit/TDM (Time Division Multiplexing)] to next generation [Packet/IP (Internet Protocol)/Ethernet]. On the financial side the challenge will be how to best make future-proof investments.

How are you using analytics on your networks to gain more subscriber knowledge?

Network analytics are important in order to gain knowledge about the behaviour of the traffic in the network. If you correctly translate this knowledge, you can gain a good understanding of how the subscriber/user/consumer/customer applications behave, and eventually, how the individuals behave. This knowledge helps operators to perform the required network and service optimizations, introduce or change products to suit that behaviour, and finally to take informed investment decisions. We are working on these lines and would like to focus more on this area in the future.

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Jim Machi, Dialogic

Jim Machi, vice president of product management for Dialogic

In my last blog I discussed the architectures needed to roam between WiFi and 3G/4G networks. In order to enable interoperability between the different architectures, a mediation and interworking platform is required to support the different scenarios in which RADIUS, Diameter and SS7 are used.

fig1_p3

As discussed in my prior blogs, RADIUS is critical for interworking with WiFi networks. Authentication and authorization of roaming subscribers is performed through RADIUS messages over an inter-operator interface between the visited network provider and home service provider. The interface can be implemented directly between two operators or through an intermediary, like an IPX or WRIX provider. The interworking functionality can be placed within either the visited or home operator’s networks, an IPX/WRIX provider or all three locations.

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Jim Machi, Dialogic

Jim Machi, vice president of product management for Dialogic

By Jim Machi, vice president of product management for Dialogic, where he is responsible for driving the overall roadmap and product strategy.

In my last blog, I discussed Wi-Fi roaming and the WRIX. The WRIX, an IPX-like exchange for Wi-Fi roaming, is broken into three levels that cover the various interactions needed between operators to support roaming.

First is the WRIX-i, or interconnect, which specifies the interface between the visited network provider (VNP) and the home service provider (HSP). WRIX-i requires use of RADIUS authentication, authorization and accounting (AAA) procedures and some specific attributes associated with access and accounting services. The WRIX-d is for data clearing and wholesale accounting. Lastly, the WRIX-I is for financial clearing and wholesale billing.

The WRIX specifications provide a high degree of interoperability between Wi-Fi operators, but real-world implementation has some obstacles. For example, it may still require RADIUS-to-RADIUS mediation and the need for interworking functionality with other signaling protocols to correct incompatibilities between operator networks. This is because one implementation of RADIUS may not exactly match another implementation of RADIUS. Plus, in order to accommodate roaming over a diverse set of user devices and network implementations, Wi-Fi and 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) network architectures will need to provide interworking between different protocols used for AAA, as well as mediate between variations of the same protocol.

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Originally posted on ytd2525:

Mobile network operators that want to deploy LTE now want to do so on their own terms; they want to roll out ultrafast mobile broadband safe in the knowledge that one vendor’s solution will work efficiently with another, while delivering the high level of service that subscribers expect. Standards-based networks can help to drive down cost for operators, but understanding how to pull it all together can be a challenge – so how does it all come together?

This blog and the LTE Architecture Technical Poster we have produced were born out of a couple of conversations between the two of us. We were trying to find the best way to illustrate LTE networking, show the various network nodes, explain the many interfaces, acronyms and standards that surround LTE and what people really need to know about modern mobile networks.  We quickly came to the conclusion that our previous poster…

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Originally posted on Huawei Club:

Do you about 5G Technology?

#Huawei #5G #Technology

What do you know about 5G Technology?

Know some interesting things about 5G & Huawei.

Take a look into the Future Here: http://bit.ly/1lHBT5o

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John Reister is vice president of marketing and product management for Vasona Networks

John Reister is vice president of marketing and product management for Vasona Networks

This post is by John Reister is vice president of marketing and product management for Vasona Network

LTE delivers rich content to the hands of people on the go, brings broadband access to rural communities, and opens new revenue opportunities for operators. Typically, just months after activation of an LTE network, consumers flood the network with heavy demands. We can’t change consumer behavior, but we can change management of the traffic that’s mushrooming on LTE networks.

Caught off-guard, some operators have responded by pushing subscribers down to 3G. Some “optimize” certain types of traffic, decreasing quality or speed in the hope of squeezing out more efficiency. Our company advocates a different approach: monitoring congestion conditions per cell and when they arise, intelligently managing the traffic in each cell for the best overall user experiences.

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Day Two of the LTE World Summit was introduced by Adrian Scrase, CTO, ETSI; Head of Mobile Competence Centre, 3GPP, who got everyone going with a rousing run through of the work that the 3GPP is currently doing on LTE standards. In all seriousness it was useful to get an update, and the stand out item was that 3GPP is indeed starting to own on standards for operating LTE in unlicensed spectrum bands at 5.8GHz. It is also beginning a study on the use of NFV in a mobile environment and expects that to finished by the beginning of 2016.

As for 5G, Scrase seemed surprised by the background noise of 5G discussions and said that standardization work won’t even start until 2016, so wouldn’t expect that any live 5G services would be running before the end of the decade.

Tell that to SK Telekom who is planning a 5G, or at least ‘pre-5G’ launch in South Korea in time for the Winter Olympics. I first heard this from SK Telecom at the Mobile World Conference in February, and it was reiterated here by Park Jin-Hyo, SVP & Head of Network Technology R&D Center for SK Telecom.

There seemed a genuine buzz from the floor to hear JinHyo’s presentation, and by the end of it you felt SK Telecom’s reputation as a telecoms leader was justified. The operator has 99 per cent coverage in its home market, (OK, I suppose!) and it has introduced Category 6 handsets (up to 300Mbps). What was great to hear was the description of its VoLTE service, with calls established on one second, and LTE Advanced – where it was touting the new services it could offer on it, including UHD 3480×2160 4K streaming, – which does beg the question – how big are its data packages?

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Once again the LTE World Summit returned to the sunny streets on Amsterdam, or at least to the interior of the RAI exhibition centre, which is nearly as good. This time up on stage a live Twitter feed was visible behind the speakers, providing an opportunity for those in the audience to get their Tweet up on the big screen in real-time – always a thrill.

Proceedings were kicked off by Erik Hoving, CTO of KPN. Hoving reiterated a theme that he has expressed before from this platform – that operators need to move away from specifications and become more people centric.

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“We need to figure out the role of the smartphone,” he said. “The future isn’t about LTE or 5G, it’s about users. If we don’t understand users, we don’t have a role to play. We need to move to a user centric world.”

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This post is by Sue White, Senior Director of IP Platforms Marketing, Alcatel-Lucent

This is a great year for voice over LTE (VoLTE), with big carriers worldwide launching the new HD service. The industry saw seven launch announcements in May alone, including AT&T in the United States and NTT in Japan. But the real VoLTE excitement is not just about better mobile voice or reducing costs.

Instead, here’s the real power in today’s VoLTE launches: It’s the first step to overhauling an outdated communication strategy, helping carriers to reach their full potential in a communications market that is very different from the one they created decades ago.

The bigger, forward-looking opportunity

To capitalize on the bigger opportunity that VoLTE brings, we first need to accept what has changed.

  • The days of charging for basic voice and text messages are gone.
  • We own several devices (and not all from Apple) and want to consume comms on all of them.
  • We don’t care what kind of network we are on (LTE, Wi-Fi, 3G, fixed or any other). We want to access comms across any of them.
  • We are social beings and like to be with groups and share.
  • We love to talk and message, and the younger ones love video comms too.

With these points in mind, what are the ingredients of a new communications strategy?

  1. Don’t think of VoLTE as voice but as the foundation for a new IP communications network that delivers ‘features’ that can be used by themselves or integrated into apps, web sites and devices. These features include HD voice, IP messaging (the long awaited replacement for text that adds content sharing and more), presence and video communications. These are the core building blocks for any real-time service.
  2. Don’t charge for basic voice, messaging and video communications. Focus instead on a new data-centric business model and win customers over with greater personalization and value. That doesn’t mean there is no money in communications, far from it, as you create value (as discussed in the blog, “The Secret Value of VoLTE”) by:
  • Increasing the amount of data people consume by connecting more people to more content across more devices. Use comms to get more devices into the data plan.
  • Creating stickiness and winning more market share for up-sell opportunities. If your subscribers have their family on one plan with a great user experience and communications included – it’s hard for them to churn from that.

With the above two ingredients in place, this is where the bigger opportunity for communications begins.

  1. Start to innovate. This has been virtually impossible until now. In fact, legacy networks don’t connect with the places we spend most of our time — the web and mobile applications. The key to innovation is to turn your IP communication assets into easy-to-consume features that can be added to any application or web site and extended to any connected device. And by easy, I mean JavaScript libraries, SDKs or REST APIs that are simple to use, on demand and require no knowledge of the back-end systems.

One example of this kind of innovation is from Alten who has built an app with our New Conversation APIs to enrich anonymous incoming VoLTE calls with supplemental information retrieved from web sources. Another is Quobis who built a client app using our WebRTC to extend VoLTE to web-connected devices, creating new revenues right from the browser.

  1. Pursue new markets where communications really matter. Large enterprises are badly in need of a communications overhaul (as discussed in the blog, “How to Kill Shadow IT”). Current enterprise landline systems are based on costly, cumbersome PBXs and siloed unified communications systems. They can’t deliver the agility and ease of use required for today’s ever-changing enterprise. And mobile devices, of course, are entirely separate. That gives carriers a great opportunity to lead with a mobile-first strategy — leveraging the strengths of VoLTE to deliver an open platform for communications, where comms are embedded directly into business apps and tools.

A good example is Phonedeck, who recently won the hackathon at the Next Gen Service Platform conference. They embedded mobile communications into a customer relationship management system using our New Conversation APIs.

And by adding geolocation, metadata and contextual information into the mix, the opportunities are endless — whether to enhance your retail services, pursue new markets (web, verticals, M2P, M2M and more) or explore new revenue models with wholesale application partners.

Cloud, the missing ingredient

These bigger and broader communications opportunities need one more thing to make them happen — the cloud. And here’s why. First, when people talk about cloud it’s usually about lowering costs through automation and significantly speeding up the time to deploy and scale new services. These are all important benefits that cloud will bring to IP communications. But there is something more fundamental.

Cloud enables you to rethink how you engage your customer. Going forward, it’s the customer or developer who will drive the service and experience they need, using your communication services on demand through APIs. For example, if a business person needs a high-quality video conferencing session, this on-demand request will be triggered by an API. Then everything behind it will be automated in the cloud — including the use of software-defined networking (SDN) to guarantee the quality of the video conference in the network.

In other words, cloud becomes the mechanism to deliver on this bigger communications opportunity, allowing you to serve your customers in an entirely new way. And that’s why several of our customers are already virtualizing parts of their VoLTE network today and moving aggressively towards a cloud-based delivery model.

These exciting opportunities all begin with VoLTE — which opens up the tremendous potential of an all-IP network and new ways of thinking. Carriers who recognize the opportunities now can lead the way, with an overhauled communications strategy that brings a new spirit of innovation, enabling your customers to drive the service experience they need.

Zhang Jianguo, VP of ZTE Corporation

Zhang Jianguo, VP of ZTE Corporation

We speak to Zhang Jianguo, VP of ZTE Corporation

In recent years the global market for LTE network deployment and construction has grown quickly. What has ZTE been doing in terms of LTE?

 ZTE has signed 145 LTE\EPC contracts and is one of the world’s top three LTE suppliers. At present we are in approximately 70 percent of countries that have invested in LTE. We have successfully launched commercial LTE services for operators including Bharti, China Mobile, China Telecom, Hutchison, Softbank, Telenor, TeliaSonera, VimpelCom, and Vodafone.

In the international market, ZTE is working with VimpelCom, KPN, Telenor and other multinational telecom operators in the development of commercial LTE networks in Russia, Belgium and Hungary. In addition, we are helping major international operators implement commercial 4G strategies and build high-quality networks.

According to a recent IHS report, ZTE became the fastest-growing LTE supplier, and the third largest, with over 100,000 LTE eNodeB shipments, accounting for 17.9 percent of the global LTE market.

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Jay Klein, CTO & VP Allot Communications

Jay Klein, CTO & VP Allot Communications

This post is by Jay Klein, CTO & VP Allot Communications

Mobile operators are getting the message. People love using their apps. And they rely on the mobile service operators to connect them to the Internet so they can use their apps. I think it’s safe to say that mobile data use is driven by apps. That’s why we see so many MSOs taking the next logical step and offering application-centric service plans, which often include zero-rating for like Facebook and WhatsApp, or flexible pricing models like AT&T’s sponsored data plans, or special rates for music, radio and movie streaming from Deezer, Spotify, YouTube, Vimeo, and Metacafe to name a few.

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Daniel Dribinski, Co-Founder and CTO, CellWize

Daniel Dribinski, Co-Founder and CTO, CellWize

This post is by Daniel Dribinski, Co-Founder and CTO, Cellwize

LTE growth continues apace. Currently, there are over 300 LTE networks with around 250m subscribers globally. And it keeps increasing. As part of their deployment strategy, many mobile operators have adopted an LTE overlay approach. This involves deploying LTE on top of existing 2G and 3G networks. Overlay is regarded as the one of the fastest and arguably, the most cost effective approach to roll out LTE. There is no need to decommission an old network and replace it with a new network, with an overlay there’s only one network to operate, manage and monitor.

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Rémi Thomas, Director of the LTE EPC Programme, Orange Group

Rémi Thomas, Director of the LTE EPC Programme, Orange Group

Rémi Thomas, Director of the LTE EPC Programme, Orange is speaking at the LTE World Summit on roaming challenges at the LTE World Summit, the premier 4G event for the telecoms industry, taking place on the 23rd-26th June 2014, at the Amsterdam RAI, Netherlands.

You’re speaking on roaming issues. What are the main challenges to bringing making LTE roaming a reality?

Orange has launched 4G roaming for data services since February this year for customers in France travelling to the UK, Spain, Portugal and South Korea. Further to this, technical readiness to deliver 4G roaming has been achieved in a further five markets including the UK (through EE), Spain, Romania, Portugal and Moldova. We anticipate 4G roaming will be fully available across Orange’s European footprint by the end of 2014, including major destinations outside of Europe.

The primary challenge for all operators however has been the mastering of new protocols because this requires complete testing. There are complexities to do with diameter signalling, especially internationally, and Orange is paying special attention to this. It is also being addressed by mobile operators via the GSMA and is on the agenda of the i3Forum as far as the carrier community is concerned.

Today CSFB is used to provide voice services to LTE roamers. As a consequence the voice services for LTE roamers rely on the present 2G/3G roaming agreements. In order to improve the voice experience (lowering setup delay, additional services), Voice over LTE (VoLTE) technology will be deployed in our networks. Then the next challenge will be the deployment of roaming for VoLTE.

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Ahead of the LTE World Summit taking place at the Amsterdam Rai in the Netherlands next week on the 23rd-25th June 2014, we asked the keynote speakers taking part in the Maximising LTE Panel Discussion, taking place on Day One, the question:

“To what extent have you virtualised your network and how important will NFV be in the future?

Frédéric Ruciak, EVP of strategy for Bouygues Telecom

Frédéric Ruciak, EVP of strategy for Bouygues Telecom

Frédéric Ruciak, EVP of strategy for Bouygues Telecom

We have not yet implemented NFV in our network but we think it may be an opportunity in the future. The main benefits will be to reduce costs in our core network and to improve time to market. We think robust and powerful solutions may go live within a three- to five-year timeframe. We’ll be cautious in terms of operations and QoS, because we may potentially move from single vendor platforms, with clear commitment, to layered environments, where we may have interoperability issues and multiple responsibilities.

Park Jin-Hyo, SVP & Head of Network Technology at the R&D Center, SK Telecom

Park Jin-Hyo, SVP & Head of Network Technology at the R&D Center, SK Telecom

Park Jin-Hyo, SVP & Head of Network Technology R&D Center, SK Telecom

Our ultimate goal is to virtualize all telecommunications equipment in implementing software. However, considering the possible impact on the existing network, in 2014 we plan to start with IMS, telecommunications infrastructure to provide HD Voice, as it is based on a general-purpose hardware server and therefore easier to apply virtualization technology.

After validating performance and stability of IT virtualization, we will continue to virtualize other network equipment as well. Going beyond virtualization of core network functions, we plan to apply the technology on base stations, the access point with customer, eventually aiming to innovate the whole structure of telecommunications infrastructure.

By applying NFV technology, a MNO can efficiently cope with ever-increasing data traffic by securing flexible network structure, apply new services at an incomparably faster pace and, as hardware and software will be separated also provide more business opportunities to SMEs. As such, SK Telecom believes that NFV technology will become a key enabler in its mid-to-long term network structure innovation.

LTE_WorldSummit_2014

Frédéric Ruciak, EVP of strategy for Bouygues Telecom

Frédéric Ruciak, EVP of strategy for Bouygues Telecom

The LTE World Summit is the premier 4G event for the telecoms industry and is taking place on the 23rd-26th June 2014, at the Amsterdam RAI, Netherlands. Frédéric Ruciak, EVP of strategy for Bouygues Telecom will be speaking on a panel dedicated to maximizing revenue from LTE, taking place on one of the conference.

To what extent have you virtualised your network and how important will NFV be in the future?

We have not yet implemented NFV in our network but we think it may be an opportunity in the future. The main benefits will be to reduce costs in our core network and to improve time to market. We think robust and powerful solutions may go live within a three- to five-year timeframe. We’ll be cautious in terms of operations and QoS, because we may potentially move from single vendor platforms, with clear commitment, to layered environments, where we may have interoperability issues and multiple responsibilities.

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Chris Pearson, President, 4G Americas

Chris Pearson, President, 4G Americas

Chris Pearson, President, 4G Americas is taking part in panel discussion on spectrum and on 5G at the LTE World Summit, the premier 4G event for the telecoms industry, taking place on the 23rd-26th June 2014, at the Amsterdam RAI, Netherlands.

Tell me more about the role that 4G Americas plays?

We’re focussed on technical facilitation and co-ordination – pre-standard, when you come up with ideas and concepts that need to go into 3GPP, or even post standard—when a standard has been made but you need an education into the wireless industry about what that means and how you get it into the marketplace.

Secondly, we do a lot or regulatory or advocacy work in the Americas. You need organisations that understand [spectrum] and can go out and work with governments on auctions and what are the internationally harmonised spectrum bands that need to come out—all kinds. We bring a real technical and international viewpoint for the Americas.

Finally, we have a lot of industry analysts and government and media that want somebody to be able to talk to, to explain the technology for them so they can do their jobs as stakeholders in the industry.

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Ahead of the LTE World Summit taking place at the Amsterdam Rai in the Netherlands on the 23rd-25th June 2014, we asked speakers taking part in the panel discussion on key spectrum challenges taking place on Day Two, the question: Is shared spectrum a magic bullet for capacity crunch issues?”

Read on below to compare and contrast the answers.

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This post is by Kevin Linehan, vice president and chief technology officer of antenna systems for CommScope.

Kevin Linehan

Kevin Linehan is vice president and chief technology officer of antenna systems for CommScope

For the first time ever, the LTE World Summit event in Amsterdam will include an Antenna Evolution Focus Day, bringing together some of the top business and technology leaders and analysts in the antenna industry. I’m very excited to be speaking at this event, but I want to share some of what I’ll be discussing with those who cannot join us.

There are basically three ways of adding capacity to a wireless network, which remains one of the primary concerns in our industry. All three impact base station antennas:

 

  • Adding spectrum
  • Improving spectral efficiency
  • Adding cell sites or sectors

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This post is by Regis Lerbour,  Tech Director, InfoVista

Regis Lerbour,  Tech Director, I, InfoVista

Regis Lerbour, Tech Director, InfoVista

LTE networks offer great benefits for mobile operators and their subscribers. For one, they are designed to easily and efficiently meet consumers’ growing demand for mobile data, which will be a crucial factor in ensuring an optimum customer experience. Plus, LTE simplifies the backhaul network, removes the need for complex and expensive network control functions, and reduces CAPEX and OPEX by using cheaper transport technology like IP and Ethernet.

However, despite these benefits, we’ve also seen a number of operational impacts arise for mobile operators deploying LTE. What many mobile operators don’t realize is that they need to dramatically change their Operations Support Systems (OSS) to plan, launch, optimize and manage these LTE networks. Here are a few tips to get the most out of LTE deployments:

Invest in mobile network planning

With higher frequencies of small cells and femtocells, a greater rate of change within the mobile network and higher expectations from subscribers, mobile operators will need to focus on their mobile network planning efforts. This particularly applies to backhaul planning, which will need to be very closely linked to the radio planning process in order to coordinate cell capacity with backhaul capability. Mobile operators will also benefit from tying in network performance data to this process in order to ensure they are able to continuously optimize LTE networks and ensure optimal performance.

Extend fault performance tools to the access network

As mobile operators scale their LTE access networks, they will need enhanced fault and performance tools to support the growing volume of connected devices. This will be accelerated as mobile operators are relied upon to manage quality of service (QoS) for more and more applications and services, such as VoLTE. With this shift, there will also be a need for trend and predictive functions that can pre-warn mobile operators of issues that require troubleshooting.

Maximize service value while supporting cost reduction

In addition to making these OSS changes, mobile operators must improve other internal processes so that they can not only deliver a great customer experience to subscribers but also realize the business benefits of LTE. This includes aligning network planning, network performance management and network optimization in order to optimize LTE functionality.

Be sure to join me at LTE World Summit for my presentation on this topic on June 25th at 2:40 p.m. During this talk, I will dive further into potential LTE stumbling blocks, and explain how the combination of LTE networks and targeted OSS changes can improve subscriber QoS and benefit mobile operators’ businesses.

While 4G is reaching maturity as a technology the industries great minds are already turning their thoughts to 5G. Ahead of the LTE World Summit and the co-located 5G Summit taking place at the Amsterdam Rai in the Netherlands next week on the 23rd-25th June 2014, we gather together the opinions on 5G from some of the speakers appearing at the event.

We asked each of the speakers the same question: compare and contrast their responses below.  

“What, in your opinion, will truly define 5G?”

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Professor Simon Saunders

Professor Simon Saunders. Real Wireless

Professor Simon Saunders, Director of Technology, Real Wireless, Chair, Spectrum Applications & Demand, UK Spectrum Policy Forum and Adjunct Professor, Trinity College Dublin, is speaking at the LTE World Summit, taking place at the on the 23rd-26th June 2014, at the Amsterdam RAI, Netherlands. Book your last minute place now to hear about key issues such spectrum challenges. 

Is shared spectrum a magic bullet for capacity crunch issues?

No. While an increase in spectrum sharing is inevitable over time, the devil is in the detail of the sharing conditions. If there is a lack of certainty, or onerous coexistence conditions, we have shown that the economic value of shared spectrum drops very rapidly compared with exclusive licenced spectrum. Given a choice, who wouldn’t prefer 50 MHz of exclusive spectrum over 100 MHz of shared spectrum with uncertain conditions?

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This post is by Ronny Haraldsvik SVP/CMO of SpiderCloud

This post is by Ronny Haraldsvik SVP/CMO of SpiderCloud

Deploying dense and scalable indoor small cell systems is not straightforward, especially when it comes do serving large enterprise customers. Our experience shows the indoor RF environment gets increasingly complex and challenging as the density of the deployment increases. This is particularly true in multi-story buildings where mobile devices experience a three-dimensional (3D) RF environment. A single handset is able to see a very large number of small cells, some on its own floor and others from floors above and below it. The radio signal inside buildings experiences flat fading, which means that even a stationary handset sees signal from small cells fluctuate by 6-8 dB. Despite such variation in signal quality, a small cell RAN should remain stable and not drop calls, or experience throughput degradation.

fig1

Figure 1: Indoor radio environment is more challenging in dense small cell deployments than macro networks.

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yousef zain

Yousef Abu-Mutawe , CTO, Zain, Jordan

As Zain in Jordan prepares to launch LTE, its CTO Yousef Abu-Mutawe is already considering the impact that 5G will have in the future. To hear more from Abu-Mutawe be sure to attend the LTE World Summit, the premier 4G event for the telecoms industry, taking place on the 23rd-26th June 2014, at the Amsterdam RAI, Netherlands. At the conference he will be speaking in a keynote panel session discussing the path to 5G on Day One of the conference.

Zain is launching LTE later this year. What have been the main challenges leading up to this?

Growing the data network is a necessity in order to maintain revenues. Maintaining the value of the company require us to move to LTE. While voice revenues are shrinking, demand for data is increasing. In fact, data is becoming the main selling point and customer retention factor. Additionally, there is the need to eliminate infrastructure bottlenecks to ensure massive capacity and massive connectivity.

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Cozzolino Sergio

Mobile apps are making a huge difference to the fortunes of Telecom Italia says Sergio Cozzolino, VP Marketing Mobile Services Development of the Italian operator in this interview ahead of the LTE World Summit, taking place on the 23rd-26th June 2014, at the Amsterdam RAI, Netherlands. To hear more from him come to on Day Two of the event where he is speaking on the subject, “Examining the Mobile App opportunities and Cloud Solutions”

How would you summarise what have you learned about the power of cloud apps for generating revenue for operators?

Mobile apps are really a disruptive phenomenon in the Internet world. They are growing so fast and are so pervasive in both business and consumers fields. The growing number of apps available on all the different app stores and the increasing number of downloads is not comparable with any other digital good—music, books, films. This enabler is facilitating access to content in the cloud, and they are boosting mobility and the increased consumption of data. LTE is completing the scenario as mobile broadband is guaranteeing access to content with the same level of reliability as fixed networks.

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corbettCorbett Rowell is Research Director for China Mobile, the world’s larger operator. Come to the LTE World Summit, taking place on 23rd-26th June 2014, at the Amsterdam RAI, Netherlands to hear him speaking on the subject of “Towards Green & Soft: A 5G Perspective”.

corbett

Ericsson has said that China is set to dominate the amount of LTE traffic worldwide. Is China Mobile ready and prepared?

China Mobile is on track for deploying over 500,000 base-stations by the end of 2014.

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