Posts tagged ‘antennas’

The RF Path to 5G

Kevin Linehan, Vice President, Chief Technology Officer Antenna Systems CommScope

Kevin Linehan, Vice President, Chief Technology Officer
Antenna Systems
CommScope

The roll-out of any new generation of mobile network technology is never as simple as flicking a switch. Much of the current discussion around 5G is about its definition. But 5G won’t truly happen until it can actually happen in the network. Like all grand designs, obstacles need to be overcome in order to achieve that goal.

Like other industry commentators, my fundamental viewpoint is that 5G will be a “network of networks.” Network densification involving macro sites, in-building wireless, metro cells and small cells will continue on the way to 5G. This densification adds more complexity to wireless networks and demands ever more sophisticated infrastructure solutions. Managing these multiple network layers efficiently is becoming ever more important to deliver 5G speeds and throughput.

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Adding Capacity Is a “Small Cell” Matter

Philip Sorrells, Vice president of strategic marketing, Commscope

Philip Sorrells, Vice president of Strategic Marketing, CommScope

This Guest Post was written by Philip Sorrells, VP of Strategic Marketing, CommScope

Everybody’s talking about them, but what exactly is a small cell? In many people’s minds, a small cell is a very low power femto cell, installed in a home or office. It’s a radio device. In my mind (and in many others, too), a small cell is anything that is not a typical macro site, deployed to solve a network capacity problem.

Small cells can be indoor or outdoor. They can vary in power level. Some are carrier grade, some are for consumers. But what defines a small cell is not one of these characteristics, but rather what a small cell is trying to do-add capacity in some manner besides a standard macro site.

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What is Unknown RF Antenna position costing your company?

This guest post was written by John Vetter, VP of Business Development, Sunsight

Directional RF antenna installations are not always dantennaone to carrier RF design specifications for azimuth, mechanical tilt and roll.  Some before/after audits have shown that as many as 40% of antennas are installed more than five degrees off target.  Using this audit data, simulations are possible with RF network propagation software and any market final design project.  These results will prove that even when using conservative misalignment changes that induced network interference can be costly to carriers specifically for newer interference prone LTE technologies.  Focusing just on carrier spectrum capital investment this number can easily become surprisingly high when considering large nationwide RF spectrum investments.   The cost of ‘wasted’ spectrum due to interference does not, but could consider additional costs of ‘unused’ BTS/RAN infrastructure, unnecessary network performance troubleshooting efforts, less the credible output from RF propagation, ACP and SON tools , and more important, the effects of poor customer data experiences  -all caused by misaligned RF antennas.

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Modernizing Mobile Networks to Tackle LTE Challenges in Asia Pacific

This post is by Philip Sorrells, Vice President, Site Solutions, CommScope

This post is by Philip Sorrells, Vice President, Site Solutions, CommScope

This post is by Philip Sorrells, Vice President of Strategic Marketing, Wireless, CommScope

Asia Pacific users lead in mobile traffic consumption. With the popularity of streaming via apps from YouTube, Youku and PPStream, users in the region on average download 1.1 GB of data per month.– According to a GSMA study, by 2015 this number will only increase and there will be more than 120 million LTE subscribers in the Asia Pacific region.

Between the leading-edge Asian Tigers of Singapore, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea and the emerging markets of Southeast Asia, China and South Asia, a number of challenges have surfaced for mobile networks in the region.

This leads to issues like spectrum and cell-site scarcity as well as the speed of network modernization.

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Searching for a common standard in 4G antennas

This post is by Kevin Linehan, vice president and chief technology officer of antenna systems for CommScope.

Kevin Linehan

Kevin Linehan is vice president and chief technology officer of antenna systems for CommScope

For the first time ever, the LTE World Summit event in Amsterdam will include an Antenna Evolution Focus Day, bringing together some of the top business and technology leaders and analysts in the antenna industry. I’m very excited to be speaking at this event, but I want to share some of what I’ll be discussing with those who cannot join us.

There are basically three ways of adding capacity to a wireless network, which remains one of the primary concerns in our industry. All three impact base station antennas:

 

  • Adding spectrum
  • Improving spectral efficiency
  • Adding cell sites or sectors

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Is The Market Ready For Active Antenna Systems?

Suzanne Rankine

Suzanne Rankine
Conference Researcher, LTE World Series,
Informa Telecoms & Media

As we move further into the LTE era, antenna systems must evolve to keep up with increasing capacity demand.

Challenges arise as operators battle against limited and expensive real estate and congestion at current sites. It’s becoming clear that operators have to do more with the space they have available if they are to provide the capacity that today’s LTE subscribers expect.

One solution currently in development are Active Antenna Systems (AAS). A recent paper from Commscope (top link), outlined the benefits of AAS. It states that AAS demonstrates significant potential to reduce the site footprint, offers built-in redundancy and improved thermal performance, which can result in lower failure rates. However, despite being ‘in field trials’ for almost 20 years, AAS are yet to reach the mass market.

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Interview: Senior Manager Antenna Solutions Group, AT&T: “Small cells offer operators a system that is potentially more cost effective than other solutions.”

Jim Parker, Senior Manager Antenna Solutions Group, AT&T

Jim Parker, Senior Manager Antenna Solutions Group, AT&T

Jim Parker, Senior Manager Antenna Solutions Group, AT&T is speaking on the subject of, “Challenges of deploying high density venues: From DAS to 4G”, in the HetNets track on Day One of the The LTE North America conference is taking place on the 21st-22nd November 2013, in Dallas, Texas, USA. Ahead of the show we speak to him about the AT&T Antenna group and its focus for the next year.

What is the core function of the AT&T Antenna solutions group?

In order to provide our customers with the best mobile broadband experience, AT&T established the Antenna Solutions Group (ASG) in order to extend the capabilities of our macro network in large public venues. ASG deploys a wide range of technologies including: neutral-host Distributed Antenna System (DAS), small cells, and Wi-Fi. Neutral host DAS and small cells provide a coverage and capacity solution for cellular voice and data traffic. In venues where Wi-Fi is deployed, it is primarily a data-only solution that can be used to offload traffic from the macro network.

The LTE North America conference is taking place on the 21st-22nd November 2013, in Dallas, Texas, USA. Click here NOW to download a brochure for the event.

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Juggling multiple bands – why choosing the right antenna is important

The Andrew Six Sector Solution converts a traditional three sector site into a higher capacity, six sector site with the use of only three antennas.

The Andrew Six Sector Solution converts a traditional three sector site into a higher capacity, six sector site with the use of only three antennas.

 This post is by Brendan Millard, Director-Wireless, Southeast Asia, at CommScope

Wireless operator networks are facing unprecedented demands for more and more capacity every day, driven by the services available on smartphones, tablets and laptops. In order to meet these demands they are looking to newer technologies in both existing and new frequency bands such as refarming 1800MHz GSM spectrum to be used for LTE or implementing new LTE networks in 700MHz.  These days, it seems there are two things a wireless operator cannot get enough of: spectrum and tower space to hang the antennas required for these new services.

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Bringing Fiber to the Antenna – What’s Your Strategy?

This post is by Brendan Millard is Director-Wireless, Southeast Asia, at CommScope

This post is by Brendan Millard is Director-Wireless, Southeast Asia, at CommScope

The dramatic shift to remote radio heads (RRH) with third and fourth generation cellular mobile technologies has created a real disconnect from the past when it comes to connectivity on cellular sites.

First and second generation cellular mobile technologies were mostly installed using traditional site architecture with the radio housed within a shelter or cabinet at the base of a tower and connected to the antenna at the top of the tower using coaxial cable. This was a well established and understood practice, the interfaces were standardised, the cable sizes were well defined in relation to the tower height and installation practices had evolved over many years to become common practice.

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Sculpting your way to minimal interference

This post is by Philip Sorrells vice president of strategic marketing, wireless, at CommScope

LTE rollouts are now happening all across Asia and have the potential to completely reshape how networks perform. Many LTE networks incorporate a technology called multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO), which splits data transmission into multiple streams and sends them at the same time on the same frequency using multiple antennas. The expression 2×2 MIMO means that there are two antennas transmitting in the downlink to two antennas receiving in the handset.

What makes this development so exciting is that MIMO offers a way around a classic limiting factor of RF communications known as Shannon’s Law, which dictates how much throughput can be delivered down a given amount of bandwidth. As Figure 1 shows, you can only expect to get to within 3dB of a bandwidth’s theoretical maximum in a practical application. With 2×2 MIMO you can potentially double the capacity over a traditional 3G implementation, which otherwise would be bound by Shannon’s law.

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