Posts tagged ‘CommScope’

Adding Capacity Is a “Small Cell” Matter

Philip Sorrells, Vice president of strategic marketing, Commscope

Philip Sorrells, Vice president of Strategic Marketing, CommScope

This Guest Post was written by Philip Sorrells, VP of Strategic Marketing, CommScope

Everybody’s talking about them, but what exactly is a small cell? In many people’s minds, a small cell is a very low power femto cell, installed in a home or office. It’s a radio device. In my mind (and in many others, too), a small cell is anything that is not a typical macro site, deployed to solve a network capacity problem.

Small cells can be indoor or outdoor. They can vary in power level. Some are carrier grade, some are for consumers. But what defines a small cell is not one of these characteristics, but rather what a small cell is trying to do-add capacity in some manner besides a standard macro site.

(more…)

Antenna Solutions Play a Crucial Role in Network Capacity Improvement

Kevin Linehan, VP and CTO, CommScope

Kevin Linehan, VP and CTO, CommScope

This post is by Kevin Linehan, VP and CTO Antenna Systems, CommScope

According to a GSMA Intelligence study, global LTE connections will hit the 1-billion mark by 2017 and Asia will account for almost half, or 47 percent of that. The demand for high speed connections and rich media experience is keeping operators on their toes and constantly upgrading and building more efficient LTE networks. As operators work towards keeping high levels of subscriber satisfaction, network coverage and capacity becomes utmost concern.

I have been in the telecommunications industry for nearly three decades and these developments are extremely exciting.  At the LTE Asia Conference, which took place from September 24-25 in Singapore, I was happy to share a presentation titled “Antennas Solutions for Capacity Improvement” in which I addressed concerns related to maximizing network capacity and developing unified industry standards for base-station antennas.

(more…)

Adding Capacity Is a “Small Cell” Matter

This post is by Philip Sorrells, Vice President, Site Solutions, CommScope

This post is by Philip Sorrells, Vice President, Site Solutions, CommScope

Everybody’s talking about them, but what exactly is a small cell? In many people’s minds, a small cell is a very low power femto cell, installed in a home or office. It’s a radio device. In my mind (and in many others, too), a small cell is anything that is not a typical macro site, deployed to solve a network capacity problem.

Small cells can be indoor or outdoor. They can vary in power level. Some are carrier grade, some are for consumers. But what defines a small cell is not one of these characteristics, but rather what a small cell is trying to do—add capacity in some manner besides a standard macro site.

With that definition in mind, I see four viable “small cell” paths for wireless operators to explore for expanding wireless capacity:

  • Distributed antenna system (DAS) – the original small cell. DAS has proven itself in the field for around for 25 years or so. DAS networks often are multi-operator, multi-technology, high capacity solutions. As Infonetics’ recent research predicts, the DAS market will continue to grow as DAS has already established itself in the operators’ toolkits.
  • Pico cells or mini remote radio heads. These solutions are targeted at adding capacity in medium to large buildings, for one operator only.
  • Multibeam antennas and sector splitting. Certain sectors in macro sites, or whole sites themselves, can be in locations that see tons of data traffic. Such hot sectors need new solutions for adding capacity, increasing gain to penetrate buildings better and/or cover more outdoor space. Splitting a sector in two about doubles the capacity, and with twin beam or multibeam antennas, one antenna can handle the job.
  • Concealed, integrated metro cells. These are basically mini macro sites, designed to address the common problems of site acquisition and licensing in congested areas. The remote radio unit, antenna and other RF path equipment are concealed in one monopole type structure.

All of these four solutions need to address the challenges of site acquisition, power, backhaul and network performance to meet operators’ needs.

What do you think of these small cell approaches? What advice can you give about deploying them in the field?

I will be talking more about them in my presentation at LTE North America on November 21 at 12:15 p.m. titled “So You Want to Go Small? – Practical Considerations for Adding Capacity in a Small Cell Approach.” (Quite a long title for a “small” subject, I know.)

Juggling multiple bands – why choosing the right antenna is important

The Andrew Six Sector Solution converts a traditional three sector site into a higher capacity, six sector site with the use of only three antennas.

The Andrew Six Sector Solution converts a traditional three sector site into a higher capacity, six sector site with the use of only three antennas.

 This post is by Brendan Millard, Director-Wireless, Southeast Asia, at CommScope

Wireless operator networks are facing unprecedented demands for more and more capacity every day, driven by the services available on smartphones, tablets and laptops. In order to meet these demands they are looking to newer technologies in both existing and new frequency bands such as refarming 1800MHz GSM spectrum to be used for LTE or implementing new LTE networks in 700MHz.  These days, it seems there are two things a wireless operator cannot get enough of: spectrum and tower space to hang the antennas required for these new services.

(more…)

Bringing Fiber to the Antenna – What’s Your Strategy?

This post is by Brendan Millard is Director-Wireless, Southeast Asia, at CommScope

This post is by Brendan Millard is Director-Wireless, Southeast Asia, at CommScope

The dramatic shift to remote radio heads (RRH) with third and fourth generation cellular mobile technologies has created a real disconnect from the past when it comes to connectivity on cellular sites.

First and second generation cellular mobile technologies were mostly installed using traditional site architecture with the radio housed within a shelter or cabinet at the base of a tower and connected to the antenna at the top of the tower using coaxial cable. This was a well established and understood practice, the interfaces were standardised, the cable sizes were well defined in relation to the tower height and installation practices had evolved over many years to become common practice.

(more…)

Sculpting your way to minimal interference

This post is by Philip Sorrells vice president of strategic marketing, wireless, at CommScope

LTE rollouts are now happening all across Asia and have the potential to completely reshape how networks perform. Many LTE networks incorporate a technology called multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO), which splits data transmission into multiple streams and sends them at the same time on the same frequency using multiple antennas. The expression 2×2 MIMO means that there are two antennas transmitting in the downlink to two antennas receiving in the handset.

What makes this development so exciting is that MIMO offers a way around a classic limiting factor of RF communications known as Shannon’s Law, which dictates how much throughput can be delivered down a given amount of bandwidth. As Figure 1 shows, you can only expect to get to within 3dB of a bandwidth’s theoretical maximum in a practical application. With 2×2 MIMO you can potentially double the capacity over a traditional 3G implementation, which otherwise would be bound by Shannon’s law.

(more…)

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: