Posts tagged ‘mobile’

LBO or not, I want to break out… (Part I)

This post is by Peter Nas, Senior Solution Architect, F5 Networks

Peter Nas, Senior Soltuion Architect, F5 Networks

Peter Nas, Senior Solution Architect, F5 Networks

 

For over ten years, the technology to offer local breakout (commonly known as LBO) has existed, allowing data use by roaming customers to be supported by the visited operator’s network. This is in contrast to the scenario in which data requests are sent back to the roamer’s home network, which of course, results in higher costs. However, despite the obvious fact that many people would like to get lower data roaming rates, a wish not limited to Europeans traveling in the EU, sadly it is not offered yet.

 

(more…)

LTE Is Not the Answer – But Wi-Fi Might Be

Jim Machi, Dialogic

Jim Machi, vice president of product management for Dialogic

By Jim Machi, vice president of product management for Dialogic, where he is responsible for driving the overall roadmap and product strategy.

Right now, LTE is in its heyday. Carriers are doing all they can to expand coverage and improve speeds, and those lucky enough to be using it probably experience great service. But as mobile data use increases, that honeymoon period will end as networks get clogged and overloaded.

As that happens, Wi-Fi networks will become an increasingly important way for carriers to improve coverage and capacity. This is opening new opportunities not only for pure-play Wi-Fi providers, but also for mobile network operators (MNOs) implementing complementary Wi-Fi networks as a means to expand coverage, decrease the cost per delivered bit and ease congestion on strained spectrum and backhaul resources.

(more…)

Head of mobile business development and partnerships, Groupon: “we see people increasingly using mobile devices as a means of interacting with their local surroundings.”

Andreas Lieber, head of mobile business development and partnerships, Groupon

Andreas Lieber, head of mobile business development and partnerships, Groupon

Head of mobile business development and partnerships, Groupon: “we see people increasingly using mobile devices as a means of interacting with their local surroundings.”

Andreas Lieber, head of mobile business development and partnerships, Groupon, USA, is taking part in a digital innovation debate in the morning of Day One of the  LTE World Summit, taking place on the 24th-26th June 2013, at the Amsterdam RAI, Netherlands. Ahead of the show we speak to him about how the mobile space has been crucial to the success of Groupon over the past two years.

To what extent is Groupon a digital company – and why is innovation in this space so important?

Groupon is at its core a digital/tech company. More than 200 million of our subscribers receive our emails, view our mobile services and search the Web every day to find curated, unbeatably-priced offers from an ever-expanding list of more than 2,000 individual types of goods and services.

Innovation in this space is extremely important because just a few years ago our business was predominantly driven by our daily email. In Q1 2013, less than 45 per cent of our North American transactions came from email, with mobile and search accounting for a greater percentage of our total business.

Since its launch in 2008 smartphones and tablets have changed the mobile landscape. What impact has this had on how you communicate with your customers?

More than 40 million people worldwide have downloaded our mobile apps, with more than seven million of those downloads coming in Q1 2013. Groupon has tremendous penetration in the mobile space and is a natural fit for this medium. As a result, our mobile business has skyrocketed from about 20 per cent of North American transactions two years ago to 45 per cent in March 2013. And, the average mobile customer spends well over 50 per cent more than Web-only customers.

The LTE World Summit, the premier 4G event for the telecoms industry, is taking place on the 24th-26th June 2013, at the Amsterdam RAI, Netherlands. Click here to download a brochure for the event.

Tell us more about how partnerships with mobile networks and use of mobile technology can help create business opportunities for Groupon.

Our apps work across multiple platforms, and we see people increasingly using mobile devices as a means of interacting with their local surroundings. And partnerships are a great way to provide relevant, incremental access points to Groupon products via the partner’s content and discovery services.

Has the potential of digital now been fully leveraged or is there scope for greater innovations in the future?

There is definitely room for us to further leverage our mobile platform. We’re constantly advancing our personalisation and are simultaneously growing our inventory, which will enable us to provide more relevant deals based on your location, current intent and personal preferences. We’re also very focused on increasing our mobile search capabilities to enable our customers to navigate this expanded inventory. Watch this space for some news soon.

Why did you choose to attend the LTE World Summit?

Mobile fits right in with our mission to make it easy for people around the world to search and discover great businesses at unbeatable prices. With its global scope and wide spectrum of attendees, the LTE World Summit is a great way for us to meet people and potential partners across the entire mobile ecosystem.

Interview: Business development director, Shazam, UK: “I am genuinely very excited about the growth opportunities for Shazam and the app economy.”

Iain Dendle, business development director for Shazam, UK

Iain Dendle, business development director for Shazam, UK

Iain Dendle, business development director for Shazam, UK is taking part in a debate on Digital Innovation on the morning of Day One of the LTE World Summit, the premier 4G event for the telecoms industry, taking place on the 24th-26th June 2013, at the Amsterdam RAI, Netherlands.

Smartphones and tablets have dramatically altered the mobile landscape yet are still only around half of the mobile phone market. How great an opportunity is this for Shazam and other digital innovators?

Over 300 million people have used Shazam to engage with music and television but I do believe this is the tip of the iceberg. Smartphone penetration has reached over 50 per cent in the US and Western Europe and Shazam is in the top 25 most downloaded apps – but we see no sign of reaching saturation point. We’re generating over 10 million new users a month, so our growth continues to accelerate at an astounding rate. Also, there is a massive opportunity in the rest of the world where smartphone penetration is much lower and where the smartphone will be many people’s first experience of using a computer. So I am genuinely very excited about the growth opportunities for Shazam and the app economy.

Conversely, what are the biggest challenges you are facing as you look to grow?

I think we’re operating in an incredibly fast-paced industry. If we are to retain their interest and deliver value to their everyday lives we need to constantly evolve and improve the proposition we deliver for our users. At Shazam, this is challenge we embrace and you can see examples of our efforts in the past few years with features like LyricPlay and Shazam Friends and new propositions like Shazam for TV. Shazam recently appointed a new CEO and CPO, which will accelerate our innovation in the coming months and years.

The LTE World Summit, the premier 4G event for the telecoms industry, is taking place on the 24th-26th June 2013, at the Amsterdam RAI, Netherlands. Click here to download a brochure for the event.

Shazam is a OTT smartphone app. Do you have any relationship with operators and is there any scope for mutual business opportunities.

Shazam has long standing partnerships with mobile operators stretching back to the days before the app stores. These relationships continue to deliver value for both parties. Shazam can deliver significant strategic benefit to an operator by driving users and usage to their content stores, whilst delighting their customers and contributing a significant financial benefit also. Shazam is responsible for selling over 500,000 items a day and this is extremely valuable to operators as they strive to offer their customer more than just a communication tariff. In return, the mobile operators represent a sizeable and efficient promotion and distribution channel for our application.

Are you excited by the 4G roll-outs taking place worldwide?

Shazam is one of the first truly mobile applications. Many of the others in the top 25 have evolved from websites but the majority of times you Shazam something, you are out and about. Whether it’s Shazaming a song in a coffee shop on your commute to work, a track played by a DJ in a nightclub, or the ads in the cinema before you watch the film, the majority of our use cases are mobile. The roll out of 4G is a massive opportunity for Shazam, as it will enable us to deliver an even richer experience to our users via streaming video of the media you just Shazam’d, to having a more immersive purchasing experiences. It enables us to deliver the same rich content you enjoy over Wi-Fi at home, but when you are mobile.

Why is innovation in the digital and mobile space so important?

A major factor is the amount of competition for your smartphone’s homescreen.  Apple has over 800,000 apps in the App store with Google Play not far behind. Apps need to constantly evolve, innovate and deliver value if they are to remain relevant and become an integral part of their users lives.

Why did you choose to attend the LTE World Summit?

LTE represents a fantastic opportunity for application developers and all other players in the smartphone ecosystem. I am intrigued to discover more about what other companies are planning to do to take advantage of those opportunities, learn from the line-up of experienced speakers, and discuss and debate topics with like-minded individuals.

Shock of the new: As mobile tech hits 40 has mobile progress gone stale?

gekko_mobile_phoneYou may have noticed the stories doing the rounds that today (3rd March 2013) marks 40 years since the mobile phone call was made – cue the traditional picture of the large brick-like mobile that those of a certain age will remember sharp-suited ‘yuppie’ types brandishing in the mid-80s.

And they did actually do this. A former boss used to tell the team repeatedly that back in the 80s he had once been able to pull over in a lay by on the motorway and secure a crucial deal because he was one of the only ones of his sales team to invest in a mobile phone. Gordon Gekko eat your heart out.

The first call was famously made by Martin Cooper, a Motorola employee who tells the tale of confused New Yorkers gawping at him in confusion as he walked around the street apparently makes a phone call – not something that up until then could have been done without the aid of a very long phone cable.

It’s called the shock of the new.

I clearly recall the experience of encountering a man in a bank who was patently a bit mad. He was walking around seemingly having a conversation with himself at the top of voice despite that fact that he wasn’t holding a phone. I remember staring at him wide-eyed as he walked around bellowing, and literally moving away to avoid this clearly crazy person. Except of course he wasn’t crazy. I didn’t realise it at the time (it was 1997) but he was just a man with a hands-free headset and no sense of the need for privacy.

Martin Cooper, a senior engineer at Motorola, who made the first mobile call

Martin Cooper, a senior engineer at Motorola, who made the first mobile call

While Cooper garnered his first amazed looks in 1973, it was 10 years for the first truly mobile phone models to appear at a cost of around $3,500, which incidentally makes the £600 SIM-free smartphone handsets we have now appear to be reasonable value.

However, these days that ‘shock of the new’ advance in mobile phone technology has arguably all but disappeared. The last time I experienced anything like it was at the launch of the Apple iPhone when I attended back in 2007. After all, it was an event which ushered in a new era of the mobile phone as a truly multi-faceted tool – a combination of mobile phone, internet device, and music player.

That was 10 years after my confusion at the loud shouty man and his hands free cable, but the muted responses to the latest models of smartphones, whether they be from Apple, Samsung or Blackberry point to a slowing down of innovation. Will it be 2017 before the next truly game changing leap is made?

In our recent interview with Eric Hoving, the CSO of KPN suggested that LTE will enable that new level of generational leap but that it won’t be to the devices – it will be to the way the internet presents itself.

“You’re going to see a different internet now as a result of LTE. What we have today is not a mobile internet — it’s mobile access to the internet…. If I go to the McDonalds website when I’m walking in Amsterdam I want to experience a different website to when I am at home. LTE will finally allow the internet to go mobile.”

To me, this sounds like Hoving is trying to describe Web 3.0 – just as dynamic web sites and enhanced interactivity defined Web 2.0, mobile will define web 3.0.

The game changer can’t be said to be LTE itself – as in the first instance it provides a smoother and more pleasant smartphone experience – it doesn’t change the game in and of itself. However, whatever device or service will come next it will certainly rely on widespread, if not ubiquitous, fast network coverage, and LTE and its immediate successor LTE Advanced will be crucial to that.

So happy 40th birthday for the mobile phone call, and here’s to the next ground-breaking milestone in mobile technology.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: